Current Mental Health Studies

Cap-Mem
Are you over the age of 14 and have a diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder or someone with no clinical diagnosis of a mental health condition?

Exploring the cause and prevalence of memory problems in people with mental health, neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders

For further information please contact:

Arti Makwana
Mobile: 07584 361 570
Office:  01622 427 210
Email:   arti.makwana@nhs.net

ACROYNM : Cap-Mem

Chief Investigator: Dr Stuart Watson                        
University / Sponsor: 
Newcastle University

Principal Investigator: Sarah Dickens

What is the study about?
It is known that people with psychiatric diagnoses are at an increased risk of problems with memory and concentration. We do not understand why this happens.
The autonomic nervous system regulates the way that our heart, lungs and digestive system work. If these systems are out of kilter then the blood supply to the brain will be slightly altered. This alteration may be enough to affect memory and concentration.
We want therefore to know if the autonomic nervous system works differently in people with psychiatric disorders. We also want to know if this system is affected by the severity of the disorder or by medication use.

Who can we include?
Clinical diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder and age, sex matched comparator subjects who do not have a clinical diagnosis of a mental health disorder. Must be over the age of 14 and have the capacity to provide informed consent.

Who do we need to exclude?
Anyone who cannot give informed consent

What is involved for KMPT staff? 
Health Care Professionals will identify potential participants either by their personal knowledge of their patients or by record searches. 

What is involved for the patients?

We want everyone who takes part to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire asks about symptoms that are caused by an upset autonomic nervous system.
Those who choose to will also complete tests of memory and concentration. These tests are done with a member of the research team who will be using a computer.

RADAR
Do you know anyone with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder or non-affective psychosis and taking anti psychotics?

For further information please contact:

Roberta Box 
Email: roberta.box@nhs.net 
Tel: 07500920737

Aims of the RADAR programme

Although antipsychotics are effective at reducing psychotic symptoms and relapse in the short-term, long-term effects remain uncertain. Therefore the National Institute of Health Research has funded a randomised trial to assess the benefits and risks of a flexible, supported strategy for antipsychotic dose reduction and discontinuation where possible, in people with schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. Participants will be randomised to have the antipsychotic reduction treatment or to continue with antipsychotic maintenance treatment.

Participants

We are looking for participants who fulfil the following criteria:

  • A diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder or non-affective psychosis
  • Over 18 years old
  • More than one episode or a single episode lasting over a year
  • Taking antipsychotics

Exclusion criteria are:

  • Participant has required acute care by the crisis team or inpatient unit in the last month
  • Being on a Supervised Community Treatment Order of the Mental Health Act
  • A serious risk of harm to self or others
  • Being pregnant or breast feeding

Patients who decide to take part will be interviewed by the research team at baseline, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months, in which they will be asked questions about their mental health. We hope that we can also follow people up for longer in the future (at 4 or 5 years, for example), as more data on long-term outcomes is really important.

The study is a ‘Randomised Controlled Trial’. Patients will be allocated at random to receive the intervention (antipsychotic reduction treatment) or the control (antipsychotic maintenance treatment).

Those taking part will receive EITHER:

  • The antipsychotic reduction treatment: A flexible, supported strategy for antipsychotic dose reduction and possible discontinuation. This would be in addition to any services, care or treatment that they would usually receive. Antipsychotic medication will be reduced gradually once every two months, or more slowly if necessary. The reduction will take place over a period of around a year, but will vary according to each individual’s starting regime and response to reduction. The aim will be for patients to discontinue medication or reduce to low doses depending on the progress of the reduction. Each patient will have an individualised schedule drawn up, but this is intended to be flexible, so that patients and clinicians can speed it up or slow it down according to response.

OR

  • Control: Antipsychotic maintenance treatment (continue with their usual care) Participants therefore will have a 50/50 chance of receiving the intervention or maintenance treatment. Risk reduction

Risk of relapse will be minimised by the gradual nature of the antipsychotic reduction, and by constant liaison between clinical teams and the research team. The research team includes a RADAR study doctor who will provide support to clinicians and help monitor patients.

What you can do

  • We would like staff to help the RADAR team identify potential participants from their caseload.
  • We would then like staff to contact these patients (by telephone or face to face), briefly explain the nature of the study, and ask patients if they would agree to being contacted by the research team.
  • If a person agrees to being contacted, please pass their details onto the RADAR team and we will then contact them.
  • The research team will then send out more detailed information to those who agree to this, and will follow this up with a telephone call to answer any further queries. The research team will ask if patients are interested in participating in the study.

Adult Autism Spectrum Cohort- UK (AASC)
Learning more about the life experiences of adults with an autism spectrum disorder and their relatives.

For further information please contact:

Arti Makwana
Tel: 01622 42 7201
Email: arti.makwana@nhs.net

Chief Investigator: Dr Jeremy Parr

University / Sponsor: Newcastle University

Principal Investigator: Andy Inett

What is the study about?

The research project aims to learn much more about the life experiences of adults with an autism spectrum disorder and their relatives. It will collect information from adults on the autism spectrum and relatives regarding their life experiences. Participants will join the nationally recruited cohort and will be followed up over the years and asked to update their information, to see how people's lives change.

Who can we include?

• Adults on the autism spectrum - Adults must be aged 16 or over
• Relatives of those on the autism spectrum

Who do we need to exclude?

• Those under the age of 16

What is involved for the patients? 

Individuals can consent to take part online at www.autismspectrum-uk.com. After registering online they will be invited to complete the online consent process. Alternatively they can fill out a contact form and receive paper forms about the project. Those taking part will then be asked to complete a questionnaire asking questions about the type of support they receive, their employment opportunities and other information about their home and daily life. They will get followed from time to time up over the years and asked to update their information, to see how their lives change.

The SlowMo Trial: A randomised controlled trial of a digital therapy for people who fear harm from others (SlowMo)
Do you know or are someone who fears harm from others? 

For further information please contact:

Hannah Herlihy
Email:  hannah.herlihy@nhs.net
Tel: 01622427210 / 07880294404

The SlowMo Trial: A randomised controlled trial of a digital therapy for people who fear harm from others.

ACROYNM :  SlowMo trial 

Chief Investigator:  Professor Philippa Garety

University / Sponsor:  King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry

Local Collaborator:  Vanessa Vartanian and Ali Jones

What is the study about?

A new talking therapy (SlowMo) has been developed that aims to help people cope with worries about others so that they can get on with their lives. SlowMo works by helping people to notice their worries and thinking habits, and then provides tips to help them slow down for a moment to notice new information and safer thoughts. SlowMo consists of eight individual, face-to-face sessions, assisted by a website with interactive stories and games. People try out tips to slow down their thinking and cope with worries, and a mobile app supports the use of these in daily life. To see how helpful SlowMo is, half of the participants will receive SlowMo while the other half will continue with their usual treatment. We will then compare how the two groups have got on.

For further information please see www.slowmotherapy.co.uk.

Who can we include? Persistent (3+ months) distressing paranoia (Green Paranoid Thoughts Scale (GPTS; Green et al.,2008) score >29, persecutory subscale), diagnosis of schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis (F20-29, ICD 10: Present State Examination, version 10), capacity to provide informed consent, sufficient grasp of English to participate in

Informed consent process, assessments and interventions.

Who do we need to exclude?

Lacks capacity to consent; profound visual and/ or hearing impairment; insufficient comprehension of English; inability to engage in the assessment procedure; engagement in psychological therapy for paranoia; primary diagnosis of substance abuse disorder, personality disorder, organic syndrome or learning disability

What is involved for KMPT staff?

Clinicians, Care coordinator or keyworker to identify participants.

UCL Research Workers will meet with participant to check eligibility to discuss the study, provide written information, respond to questions and seek written informed consent. Assessment and therapy sessions will be recorded

What is involved for the patients?

An initial meeting, followed at 3 and 6 months. There will also be a couple of short tasks to find out about their thinking habits. They will be randomly allocated to either continue with usual care or receive SlowMo and usual care. Research assessments and any therapy sessions will also take place.

Prevalence of Pathogenic Antibodies in Psychiatric Illness (PPIP2)
Do you know anyone or are you suffering from acute psychosis symptoms?

For further information please contact:

Megan Setterfield
Email: megan.setterfield@nhs.net
Phone: 07584 384627

ACROYNM : PPiP2

Chief Investigator: Dr Belinda Lennox

University / Sponsor: University of Oxford

Principal Investigator: Dr Justin Izekor

What is the study about?

The study aims to understand if some cases of psychiatric illness are caused by immune system problems in some people. The immune system normally controls our ability to fight infection. If the immune system goes wrong it may cause diseases called ‘autoimmune’ diseases. This study aims to diagnose some of these immune diseases using blood tests.

Who can we include?

  • Anyone aged 18-70
  • Currently experiencing acute psychosis symptoms: current episode lasting for at least the past two weeks but no longer than two years. (Patients can have Psychosis for longer than two years but are required to have a minimum 6 month of remission period before latest episode)

Who do we need to exclude?

  • Patients with any other neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, cerebrovascular disease, hydrocephalus, traumatic brain injury, meningo-encephalitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, CNS vasculitis.
  • Patients whose primary diagnosis is drug induced psychosis (concurrent drug use is ok).

What is involved for KMPT staff?

Screen your caseload for eligible patients and see if they are interested

What is involved for the patients?

  • A single blood test and brief assessment performed by the research team (approx. 15mins)
  • Patients will receive a £10 voucher to compensate for their time and inconvenience.
  • The local researcher will inform the care team of blood results.
  • Positive cases will be referred to the SINAPPS2 trial for eligibility screening. SINAPPS2 is a clinical trial using intravenous immunotherapy to treat patients.

The effect of cannabis use on brain function in early psychosis.
Do you know anyone who is aged 18 - 38 years and has had their first psychotic episode within the last 5 years and either uses or does not use Cannabis?

For further information please contact:

Hannah Herlihy
Email:  hannah.herlihy@nhs.net
Tel: 01622427210 / 07880294404

Chief Investigator:  Sagnik Bhattacharyya

University / Sponsor: King’s College London

Principal Investigator: Prof Hana Soliman

What is the study about?

The study as two main aims:

  1. To examine whether differences exist in glutamate measures in patients with early psychotic illness who use cannabis and those who do not.
  2. To examine whether there is any functional correlation of such differences with brain activation between cannabis users and non-users.

Who can we include?

  • Age 18-38 years,
  • First psychotic episode within the last 5 years.
  • Either use or do not use cannabis.
  • Do not currently use other drugs (apart from cannabis, tobacco and alcohol). No problems with other drugs or alcohol.
  • Clinically stable on treatment (able to tolerate a whole day of assessments and a 90 minute MRI scan).

Who do we need to exclude?

  • History of neurological disorder, severe intercurrent illness, pregnancy;
  • Acute intoxication with any psychoactive substance on the day of experimentation;
  • Any contraindications to MRI.  What is involved for the patients?  Patients will receive £50 cash for attending a Study Visit Day in London lasting approx. 6hours.  Travel is also paid for.  The day visit includes the following components:
  • Initial assessments
  • Urine Drug Sampling
  • Breathalyser
  • Blood test
  • Cheek Swab sampling
  • MRI Scans - MRS & fMRI (90 min)
  • Computer based cognitive tasks. 

Genetics of Childhood Psychosis 
Are you aged 5 – 30 years and have been diagnosed with an idiopathic psychotic illness at the age 13 or younger or Blood relative of someone who fits this criteria?

For further information please contact:

Roberta Box
Email: roberta.box@nhs.net
Tel: 07500920737 or 01622 427211

Chief Investigator
Dr Anna Need, Lecturer in Neurogenetics

University / Sponsor
Imperial College London

Principal Investigator

Collette Chamberlain, Specialist Nurse Practitioner, Early Intervention Psychosis Team.

What is the study about?
The purpose of this study is to discover how differences in DNA may make it more or less likely that people develop psychiatric illness.  If we can identify the parts of the DNA that affect our vulnerability to psychiatric illness then we may be able to use this information to try to help people who have psychiatric illnesses such as mood or anxiety disorders, or schizophrenia.

Who can we include?

  • Males or females aged 5 – 30 years.
  • Diagnosed with an idiopathic psychotic illness at age 13 or younger.
  • Blood relatives of the above.

What is involved for KMPT staff? 
KMPT staff are asked to please identify patients meeting this criteria and refer them to the Research Team using the contact details below.

What is involved for the patients?
A semi-structured psychiatric interview of their mental health, a psychometric test and a saliva sample.
They will be given a £30 voucher to thank them for their time

What is involved for the relatives?
Siblings: Psychiatric interview of their mental health, psychometric testing and a saliva sample
Parents: Family history interview, interview about their own mental health and a saliva sample
All relatives will be given a £30 voucher to thank each of them for their time.

Recovering Quality of Life (ReQoL): Development of a brief generic measure of quality of life recovery in mental health populations.
Are you 16 or over, with any mental health condition?

For further information please contact:

Megan Setterfield
Email: megan.setterfield@nhs.net
Phone: 07584 384627

ACROYNM : ReQoL

Chief Investigator: Professor John Brazier

University / Sponsor: University of Sheffield

Principal Investigator: Hanaa Soliman

What is the study about?
The aim of this questionnaire study is to understand feelings and monitor progress of recovery and quality of life for people with different mental health conditions. The hope is that this will improve mental health services in the future.

Who can we include?

  • Service users aged 16 and over with any mental health condition (self-reported or clinician diagnosis where possible)

  • Only secondary and tertiary care service users as HoNOS is only collected in these settings. 

Who do we need to exclude?

  • Service users with dementia.

What is involved for KMPT staff?

  • Clinicians to collaborate with research staff in recruiting patients to the study

  • Participant clinicians to complete a HONOS within 2 days of participant consent

What is involved for the patients?

  • Participants will be asked to complete 3 short questionnaires (ReQoL-10, S-WEMWBS & CORE-10) which should take no longer than 10 minutes to complete. These questionnaires assess quality of life of those living with mental health problems.

Carers for People with Psychosis e-support resource (COPE-Support)
Are you supporting a loved one affected by psychosis, aged 18 or above, living in England, and enjoy using internet resources? Then check out COPe-support.

For further information please contact:

Megan Setterfield
Email: megan.setterfield@nhs.net
Phone: 07584 384627

ACROYNM : COPe-support

Chief Investigator: Dr Jacqueline Sin

University / Sponsor: St George’s, University of London 

Principal Investigator: Meena McGill

What is the study about?

This study aims to find out if an online resource called ‘COPe-support’ works to improve carers’ wellbeing and how well they cope with caring, using a randomised controlled trial (RCT) design. COPe-support provides peer support, information on psychosis and ways for carers to look after themselves, all online via http://cope-support.org

Who can we include?

  • Unpaid carers who provide caring support for a loved one with psychosis.
  • Carers can be parents, partners, siblings, other relatives or close friends who do not have a biological relationship with their cared-for person.
  • Carers need to have at least weekly contacts with the cared-for person although these contacts could be in a variety of formats, e.g. face to face, phone calls, emails, social media such as facebook or text messages.
  • Those aged 18 or above, living in England, able to communicate in English, and have regular access to the internet.

Who do we need to exclude?

  • Those who care for someone with a mental illness other than psychosis
  • Cannot include more than one carer who might share the caring for the same individual

What is involved for KMPT staff?

  • Clinicians to pass on flyers and other information to their patients with psychosis and encourage them to give them to their carers.
  • Clinicians to pass on the names of any carers they believe meet the inclusion criteria and gain their consent to be contacted by the research team.

What is involved for the patients?

  • Complete online baseline questionnaires (approx.. 15 mins)
  • Be randomly allocated by computer to receive either COPe-support or an online information webpage (on top of any other services participants are receiving).
  • Participants will have access to the online resource they have been allocated to for 8 months
  • participants to complete further online questionnaires to see how they are feeling after 2 months, 4 months, and 8 months of using the resource
  • Participants will receive £30 as a thank you for their time

Assertive Responding to Voices:
Are you over 18 and have been hearing voices for at least 6 months, irrespective of diagnosis?

For further information please contact:

Megan Setterfield
Email: megan.setterfield@nhs.net
Phone: 07584 384627

ACROYNM : AppRoVE

Chief Investigator: Mark Hayward

University / Sponsor: University of Sussex

Principal Investigator: Adam Kasparek

What is the study about?

This study aims to develop two questionnaires – one that can measure assertive responding to voices and another that can measure assertive responding to other people. The idea is that these questionnaires would be used to assess how successful current psychological therapies are in helping people respond more assertively to the distressing voices they hear.

Who can we include?

  • Those over 18 years who have been hearing voices for at least 6 months, irrespective of diagnosis
  • Able to read and write in English

What is involved for KMPT staff?

  • Clinicians working in CMHTs and in inpatient units to refer any clients who meet the inclusion criteria
  • Referring clinicians to inform their patients that we will be discussing risk in order to assess eligibility

What is involved for the patients?

We would like patients to complete six questionnaires.  We estimate it will take approximately 60 minutes in total to complete all of the questionnaires. These questionnaires will ask about patient’s experience of hearing voices, how they respond to voices and other people, as well as some more general questions about their emotional wellbeing and quality of life.